Snapon ratchet dating online dating site usernames

This sort of problem is actually fairly common, but hadn't been noted previously for a Snap-on tool.In this ratchet the original "S" spring for the pawl bias has been replaced by a detent ball seated in the handle.The reverse is stamped with two date codes, an asterisk symbol "*" for 1931 on the head, and the four-cornered symbol for 1933 on the cover plate.(See middle inset.) The patent pending notation on the ratchet corresponds to patent #1,854,513, filed by L. Hummel in 1930 and issued in 1932 with assignment to Snap-on.Sockets were offered in shallow and deep styles, and with hex or double-hex (and sometimes double-square) broachings.The introduction of air-powered impact wrenches lead to a need for special impact-grade sockets, and the growing use of metric sizes required special sockets. 120 shows an early 3/8-drive Snap-on F-70 ratchet, with markings "Snap-on Kenosha, Wis." forged into the shank, and with "Patent Appl'd For" forged into the reverse. The original finish was chrome plating, though most has been lost to wear and rust.

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Some of the bits from my Bahco screwdriver are date coded 2002. t=82233 "I have enough money to last me the rest of my life, unless I buy something." Jackie Mason I have an old ratchet that is stamped snap on milwaukee usa. These "S" springs are subject to wear from rubbing on the pawl and cover plate, causing eventual breakage; in addition, the spring can easily be lost if the ratchet is disassembled for repair. The overall length is 9.5 inches, and the finish is polished chrome. The patent notice refers to the 1932 Hummel patent #1,854,513 mentioned previously. 123 at the left shows a 3/8-drive Snap-on F-70A ratchet, marked with the Snap-on logo and "Kenosha Wis." forged into the shank, and with "Patent No. The face is stamped with a stylized "5" date code for 1935, placed between the "On" and "Off" markings below the shift lever.The reverse face plate is stamped with the date code for 1933, a four-cornered symbol resemling a diamond but with the sides bowed inward. The patent notation on the ratchet refers to the 1932 Hummel patent #1,854,513 mentioned previously.This important patent formed the basis for most of the reversible ratchets produced by Snap-on, and ratchets of this same design remain in production today. The overall length is 9.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.This early ratchet uses a somewhat fragile "S" shaped spring to provide the bias on the pawl, as is described in the patent document. 71 reversible ratchet, with "Snap-on Kenosha, Wis." in raised letters forged into the shank, and with "Patent Applied For" forged into the reverse. 71A reversible ratchet, marked on the shank with the Snap-on logo and "Kenosha, Wis." in raised letters, with a "Pat. The top face is stamped with a stylized "4" date code for 1934, placed between the "On" and "Off" markings below the shift lever. The finish is plain steel for the body with chrome plating on the cover plate, though most has been lost due to wear.

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