Plant and krauss dating

He sips a latte Correction: The number of Grammys Robert Plant and Alison Krauss won for their album Raising Sand was incorrect in a previous version of this story.

NEW YORK — Think about Robert Plant and the images of the "golden god" come to mind — the thick, blonde hair, sparkling blue eyes, slim physique — combined with a bluesy yelp that practically defined the raw power of rock 'n' roll.

(More tour dates are expected soon.)Settling down for an interview on a velveteen-covered couch in a cavernous room at the Bowery Hotel in Manhattan, Plant uses the example of another band to explain the type of audience he covets. They had such a huge following because they were coming from a place that, even though it was from an altered state, it was definitely real.

Most of the music we (in England) were surrounded by was slush, without any commitment. I was born again and saved and reincarnated by American music."Dave Pegg, long-time bassist for British folk-rock group Fairport Convention, well remembers Plant's youthful musical passion.

I’m coming to the greater New York area soon, actually.

The Capitol Theater [in Port Chester, on September 25], and then the Brooklyn Academy of Music [on September 27 and 28].

His true creative breakout may have been 2007's teaming with bluegrass icon Alison Krauss for Raising Sand, a platinum album that won six Grammy Awards (including album of the year) and garnered him heaps of critical praise for a perceived change in sound.

In truth, his sound has never been static."My preoccupation as a very young early teenager was a music form that I might have missed. If I had missed it, I would never have sung," he says.

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