Dating a bisexual male

and the concept is one of the three main classifications of sexual orientation along with heterosexuality and homosexuality, all of which exist on the heterosexual–homosexual continuum.

A bisexual identity does not necessarily equate to equal sexual attraction to both sexes; commonly, people who have a distinct but not exclusive sexual preference for one sex over the other also identify themselves as bisexual.

Hirschfeld created a ten-point scale to measure the strength of sexual desire, with the direction of desire being represented by the letters A (for heterosexuality), B (for homosexuality), and A B (for bisexuality).

On this scale, someone who was A3, B9 would be weakly attracted to the opposite sex and very strongly attracted to the same sex, an A0, B0 would be asexual, and an A10, B10 would be very attracted to both sexes.

It further stated that, for most people, sexual orientation is determined at an early age.

The American Psychiatric Association stated: "To date there are no replicated scientific studies supporting any specific biological etiology for homosexuality.

Similarly, no specific psychosocial or family dynamic cause for homosexuality has been identified, including histories of childhood sexual abuse." Research into how sexual orientation may be determined by genetic or other prenatal factors plays a role in political and social debates about homosexuality, and also raises fears about genetic profiling and prenatal testing.

Le Vay compares Hirschfeld's scale to that developed by Kinsey decades later.

Sigmund Freud believed that every human being is bisexual in the sense of incorporating general attributes of both sexes.

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